Webinar Mistakes you are trying to avoid

After watching the 10 Common Webinar Mistakes to Avoid In 2018 webinar, were there any mistakes you make today in your webinars that stood out to you?


If so, what tips from Mark are you going to implement in your upcoming programs? Are there any other tips and tricks you all have that Mark may not have of mentioned?

Webinar Checklist.pdfWe are guilty of the "Robotic Webinar", but starting to "spice" things up.


Other good "tips & tricks" that we use, that Mark has not mentioned, is that we actually compile a document with all of the questions asked during the live webinar, and provide the answers. We then send this PDF document to all who attended, and you have no idea how thankful our customers are! It's another great "touchpoint" for us to engage with our customers, and/or potential customers.


Also, the day of the webinar, we have a simple 'check-list' that we review with our presenter. We make sure we check/review things like:


  1. Connect to the internet using the Ethernet cable for the best webinar and audio quality.
  2. If you are in a private room, put a note in front of the room indicating that there is a live customer webinar going on and to not make any noise.
  3. Turn cell phones off or on airplane mode (this affects the connectivity).
  4. If using personal PC and sharing screen, log off from email and other apps that could pop-up during the webinar.
  5. Have a bottle of water for your use during webinar.
  6. Prepare your environment (please be in a closed room. Ensure all windows and doors are closed to prevent unwanted noise..
  7. Have someone take a picture of you, preparing for the webinar, so we can upload to Facebook for Workplace that morning.
  8. And more.... Feel free to donwload the checklist attached!! : )



Alexandra Jordan

Halliburton

alexandra.jordan@halliburton.com





Start late and do not allow tome at the end for any final Q&A.

Test your audio/video not just for connection issues but also for the "right" look and sound. Somewhere is a video of me with the WORST backlighting in a conference room that was echo-y. I have such regrets about that webinar :(

Investing in one light that goes on top of your computer and making sure that sound is perfect are two easy ways to go from webin-"eh" to webin-"ohhhhhhh".

One thing that we are trying to improve is robotic sounding speakers. I think part of this is finding the charismaitc speakers and also coaching not to read notes.

That was a good session

Always have a practice run, to make sure speakers are prepared!

our network always seems to have lags in time. so we are constantly refreshing to see attendees (come and go), keep speakers aware of lag times as well for Q&A, always test like everyone says. Always have a quiet place to record/do live webinars.

I made the mistake of not getting enough marketing people to help run the webinar. The worst mistake along these lines was at a live event that had nearly 300 attendees. I was trying to run all the equipment, respond to questions, and advance the presenters slides... all at the same time. It was way more stressful than it needed to be. Don't be afraid to ask for HELP!

We always default to audio presenting with slides, rather than incorporating videos to increase engagement.


Sometimes our speakers run over and we have a limited amount of time for Q&A. In our survey at the end of the webcast, our lowest ratings are always with regards to questions being asked.

Practice often. Make sure the speaker has the plug in if she is sharing screen. Way ahead of the actual event !!!

Make sure your other presenters know not to put their phone on hold while logged into the presenter phone bridge. Even though they are muted their hold music will play and you will quickly need to manually mute them.

Webinars that are too long! We find a 45 minute time block is much easier for folks to make a commitment.

1 Like

We've been doing webinars for 7 years now so we have had our share of mistakes. We try to keep our webianrs at 30 minutes plus q&a so we prevent drop off of engagement. Right now we are testing out camera and sound equipment for our first ever live in studio interview. We don't want to make the mistake of going into that without having tested and practiced a few times!

We are running webinars that are way too long! Sometimes they push over an hour and people definitely start to drop off after 45 minutes.

Keeping our webinars under an hour and providing time for Q&A

We like to pre-record spakers if we can. Reducess pressure knowing that we can re-record if needed. We also try to have short and focused webinars for better engagement.

1 Like

Keep webinars short (30 minutes or so) and think about the timing (not first thing Monday morning or 4:00 on a Friday).

One thing that we are trying to improve is robotic sounding speakers. I think part of this is finding the charismaitc speakers and also coaching not to read notes.

I agree with previous comments-I think it's important to sound authentic and natural rather than like you are "reading from a script". I will endeavor to not only use this tactic when covering the opening comments and housekeeping, but also encourage our speakers to do the same.